Tainted Love: The Stubborn Devotion to the Acoustic Age is Stunting Musical Opportunities for Gen Z

The beauty of music; a language that cannot be limited by words, yet effectively communicates and evokes emotion. Hugely impactful in the human experience, and a pinnacle inclusion in cultures across the globe. Would it not be a shame if the opportunity to experience and learn music was tainted because of those who love the subject, were not willing to evolve?

According to an inquiry from the Music Commission, music education does not reflect the realities of how young people engage with music, yet there is hope if we are willing to change the way we teach...


The Music Commission explores how to better sustain and support progress in making and learning music. The Commission involves an 18-month inquiry to discover accurate findings and research. Their final report was published on the 4th of March 2019. It sets out key themes and recommendations for improving how governments, music organisations, schools, teachers, parents and learners, look at progress and progression in learning music.


The latest report argues that the integration of technology in music education could help improve the focus schools place on learning music.

From apps & software that empowers students to compose music from a touch of their finger to learning how to play a new instrument via free tutorials on Youtube, the opportunities of improving progressive teaching of music are endless.


The report states, "this is not about one replacing the other, but bringing together the best in technology to work alongside and challenge acoustic music-making to create more relevant contemporary practise". The focus of music education should be ensuring every student is supported to take music further, comments the report. Making and sharing music should be the core of music education, and with the accessibility and low cost of new technologies, there are limited objections of value to integrate these resources.



The Musicians' Union suggested in 2018, that children of lower socioeconomic families are being priced out of learning musical instruments. The report found that these children had a 50% lower chance of taking music lessons, despite the research of how music shines a major benefit and improvement in mental health and character-building skills.


Music Commission Chairman, Sir Nicholas Kenyon, acknowledged that there are a host of pressures on schools to meet academic targets. There is a diverse range of ways students can learn and experience music, however, he is still concerned that too many music education environments do not reflect the realities of how young people positively and continuously engage in music.


So it poses the question, what are changes you can implement in the classroom to improve the integration of music in your students lives?



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