Synthesising our world with MusicEDU

One integrating cultural cohesion between our nations is Music! MusicEDU is excited to have American schools join our Australian MusicEDU family in using the MusicEDU programs. We want to share some of the fascinating differences that our two countries have which can be viewed in the spelling, syntax and grammar usage whilst reading the MusicEDU digital eBooks.

An International Concert of Engaging Participation!


Yes, Music integrates cultures and brings peace between nations! Just look at how students admire and follow after musicians, no matter what their national origin. Right here, within our own capacity is the very merging answer to many of the distinctive cultural diversities that are displayed so repeatedly in today's societies. Our whole world is definitely experiencing an era of needing peace between our nations.


Before giving you lists of our countries' grammatical contrasts first, let's discuss the importance of teaching our students to accept cultural differences in order to shape characters of compassion. Together we can form an International concert of engaging participation!


Sometimes teachers are faced with a few students who might be challenged in understanding anything different than their own country's attitudes. Cultural differences are in every corner of our globe. If a student has been raised in a culturally prejudiced home and environment, teachers have to work even harder to turn around the embedded thoughts and stigmas. This can also be prevalent in opinions regarding other countries.


Tough to change? Yes. One approach can be to address 'interesting and exciting' ideas and activities that join our countries, thus turning prejudgments into acceptance. Looking at the differences between our countries can be fascinating, educational and character-building for young minds.


Synthesising our world with MusicEDU


The 'engaging and exciting' activities that will synthesise our world's classrooms are MusicEDU's four programs: Keyboard Evolution, Studio Sessions, TrackFormers and GameComposer


Australian v’s/vs United States grammatical differences


As our two countries merge in the exciting world of MusicEDU, we want to give you examples of differences in grammar and spelling that can be read in the MusicEDU digital eBooks and on our website. Already, in the above content are three examples:


  1. In this blog's title, Australia spells Synthesising, whilst America spells Synthesizing.

  2. Commas in lists: a. In Australian punctuation, when there are three or more items in a list, a comma is not used before the conjunction. For example Keyboard Evolution, Studio Sessions, TrackFormers and GameComposer. b. In US punctuation, when there are three or more items in a list, a comma is used before the conjunction. For example Keyboard Evolution, Studio Sessions, TrackFormers, and GameComposer.

  3. Quotation marks: Quotation marks are opposite in Australian English and US English. In Australia, single quotation marks are used: 'interesting and exciting', whereas in the United States, double marks are used: "interesting and exciting." In Australia, the punctuation is placed outside the quotation mark; in the US, the punctuation is placed inside the quotation mark.

  4. v's/vs In Australia, versus is abbreviated v's. In the US, versus is abbreviated vs.


More grammatical contrasts in Australian and United States English.



Note: In all the below lists, Australia is posted on the left and the United States on the right.


Words ending in ise v's ize


The following is a list of some of the more common spellings, including words you will see in your MusicEDU digital ebooks and website. Basically, any word that ends in ise in Australian English, ends in ize in US English. 

accessorise – accessorize apologise – apologize agonise – agonize analyse – analyze appetiser – appetizer authorise – authorize baptise – baptize capitalise – capitalize centralise – centralize characterise – characterize civilise – civilize computerise – computerize conceptualise – conceptualize cosy - cozy customise – customize digitise - digitize dramatise - dramatize economise – economize emphasise - emphasize empathise - empathize energise - energize externalise – externalize familiarise - familiarize fantasise - fantasize fictionalise – fictionalize

finalise - finalize formalise - formalize generalise - generalize globalise - globalize harmonise – harmonize hospitalise - hospitalize idealise - idealize individualise - individualize initilise – initialize intellectualise - intellectualize internalise - internalize internationalisation - internationalization italicise - italicize localise - localize maximise – maximize memorise - memorize minimise - minimize modernise – modernize moralise - moralize motorised - motorized nationalise - nationalize naturalise – naturalize neutralise - neutralize normalise - normalize optimise - optimize

organise – organize organisation – organization recognise – recognize oxidisation – oxidization personalise - personalize prioritise – prioritize professionalise – professionalize publicise – publicize randomise - randomize rationalise - rationalize realise - realize recognise - recognize rhapsodise - rhapsodize romanticise - romanticize socialise - socialize specialise - specialize standardise - standardize summarise - summarize synthesise – synthesize systemise – systemize theorise - theorize utilise - utilize verbalise - verbalize visualise – visualize vocalise - vocalize


Words ending in our v's or:

flavour – flavor colour – color neighbour – neighbor humour – humor labour – labor


Words ending in re v's er:

centre – center fibre – fiber litre – liter theatre - theater or theatre


Words ending in ogue v's og:

analogue - analog catalogue - catalog dialogue - dialog


Words ending in a vowel, plus L:

counsellor - counselor fuel - fuel fuelled – fueled fuelling - fueling travel - travel travelled – traveled travelling – traveling traveller – traveler


Nouns that end in ence v's ense:

defence – defense licence – license offence – offense pretence - pretense


Other Words:

whilst - while enrolment - enrollment


Commas:

Commas in lists: a. In Australian punctuation, when there are three or more items in a list, a comma is not used before the conjunction. For example:  ...Keyboard Evolution, Studio Sessions, TrackFormers and GameComposer. b. In US punctuation, when there are three or more items in a list, a comma is used before the conjunction. For example: Keyboard Evolution, Studio Sessions, TrackFormers, and GameComposer.


Quotation marks:

Quotation marks are opposite in Australian English and US English. In Australia, single quotation marks are used: 'interesting and exciting', whereas in the United States, double marks are used: "interesting and exciting." (Also, note yet another difference regarding the punctuation. In Australia, the punctuation is placed outside the quotation mark; in the US, the punctuation is placed inside the quotation mark.)


Placement of dates:

Australia: 15 April 2017, 15/04/17, or 15.04.17  United States: January 15, 2017, 01/15/17, or 01.15.17

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Websites researched for the above blog post:


Australian Spellchecker: https://www.spellchecker.net/english_australia_spell_checker.html

Australian Directory: https://www.macquariedictionary.com.au/resources/view/resource/6/

Differences in Australian, British, and Australian English https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-differences-between-American-British-and-Australian-English

Griffith University Writing and Editing Style Guide: https://www.griffith.edu.au/__data/assets/file/0008/669122/Writing-and-Editing-Style-Guide.pdf

Kelvin Eldridge, Australian English Expert:    Dictionary: http://www.australian-dictionary.com.au/    Spellchecker/Wordcheck: http://www.australian-dictionary.com.au/wordcheck/

Ordinary words and phrases: https://www.fionalake.com.au/info/translations/australian-american-words

The Greenslade Free Australian Style Guide http://www.editoraustralia.com/styleguide.html

The 20 Biggest Differences Between British and American English http://www.onlinecollegecourses.com/2012/01/23/the-20-biggest-differences-between-british-and-american-english/

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